El imperio europeo se hunde

Entrevista por Miguel Mora, Revista Contexto, Madrid, 13 de marzo, 2019.

¿Cómo definiría esta fase del capitalismo?

El experimento neoliberal ha fracasado: no ha traído prosperidad ni ha resuelto el conflicto entre las clases, mientras vemos que en muchos países aparecen distintas formas de revuelta contra el capitalismo globalizado, movimientos anticapitalistas o, mejor dicho, antiinternacionalistas. El neoliberalismo siempre fue un movimiento internacional que abrió las economías nacionales, y ese es ahora el objetivo de la resistencia. En parte sucede esto porque la izquierda de la tercera vía se unió a la fiesta internacionalista en medio de la euforia globalizadora y perdió la conexión con la gente a la que el sistema iba dejando atrás. Por eso los “chalecos amarillos” en Francia ya no se consideran de izquierdas, porque la izquierda no ha sabido responder a sus preocupaciones y los sindicatos han quedado fuera de la lucha. (…)

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Globalization and the Transformation of the International State System

Norbert Lechner Lecture, Diego Portales University, Chile, November 14, 2018.

In a globally integrated capitalist economy borders between states are supposed to become economically irrelevant. Globalization is the ultimate form of liberalization; it shields free markets, instituted on a global scale, from national state intervention, in particular of a redistributive kind. Rather than markets located in states, under globalization states become located in markets. This has momentous consequences for the nature of statehood, both domestically and internationally. States located in markets lose the capacity to protect their economies and societies from market competition; in fact their economic role, if one is left for them at all, is to deregulate their national economies in order to make them more competitive, internally first and as a consequence externally as well. (…)

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The artifice for capitalism’s survival will not work forever

Interview with the Greek online journal, Marginalia , October, 2018.

In your most recent book (How will capitalism end?, 2016) you mention that the history of capitalism has been, since the 19th century at least, a history of its crises. However, the various predictions of its end have been proven wrong until now. Today, alongside a widespread consensus on the seriousness of the ongoing crisis, there is a total disagreement on how and if it is going to have an end at all. How can one explain this “Babel”? Does it make sense anymore, after so many false predictions, to ask economists and sociologists to predict the future?

What older theories of capitalist decline, or capitalist end, did not know, and could not know, is how many different forms capitalism as a social and economic system can assume – from liberal to state-administered to neoliberal, or from merchant to industrial to financial, etc. etc. Often enough, these transformations happened in the last minute, forced by crises, powerful countermovements, or, not least, the rise of the state and global warfare in the twentieth century. Still, the basic problem of modern capitalism remains: it is a socio-economic regime that depends on endless growth – endless accumulation of capital – in a finite world. All sorts of tricks have been invented to suspend that problem provisionally and for the time being; but there is no reason to believe that this will always be successful. In any case, giving up on thinking only because the question is difficult is not a good idea. (…)

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Greek version

Marx’s writing more relevant today than ever

Interview by Jipson John and Jitheesh P.M., Monthly Review Online, December 06, 2018.

Originally published in Frontline, November 09, 2018

In “How will capitalism end?”, your 2014 article for “New Left Review”, you gave a theoretical farewell to capitalism. You identified five disorders to the system, namely, declining growth, oligarchy, starvation of public sphere, corruption and international anarchy that would bring about the end of capitalism. Are you saying that such an end is impending or immediate before us?

I am not saying that. I am saying that those five trends will continue as there is nothing to be seen that can stop them. I am also saying that there is no new society waiting in the wings of history, which will only have to be instituted by the forces of capitalist opposition. Instead, I am expecting a long period of high uncertainty and disorder—an interregnum in which the old order has died while a new order cannot yet be born. Very strange things can happen in such a time, as Antonio Gramsci pointed out in a famous passage of his The Prison Notebooks.

You argue that capitalism will continue to regress and atrophy until at some point it might end. You also add that we do not need to confront capitalism but let its “natural” end come about. Will capitalism end in such a peaceful manner or will it endanger humanity? People such as John Bellamy Foster speak of either socialism or exterminism as the choice before humanity.

The interregnum will be an extremely dangerous period. It is not that we don’t need to confront capitalism. I said we don’t have the collective capacity to do away with it. I wish we did. But capitalism is now a global regime while anti-capitalist politics is inevitably local. That makes it possible to throw sand into the wheels of capitalist development but, I am afraid, not to end it. (…)

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Legado de Merkel es un montón de promesas vacías

Entrevista por Catalina Göpel, La Tercera, 19 de noviembre, 2018.

De visita en Chile para participar de la tercera cátedra Norbert Lechner 2018 “Globalización y la crisis del sistema estatal internacional” organizada por la Universidad Diego Portales, el sociólogo alemán Wolfgang Streeck, del Instituto Max Planck para los Estudios de Sociedades, conversó con La Tercera para abordar -entre otras cosas- los principales desafíos de Europa frente al auge del populismo en ese continente y el fin de la carrera política de la canciller germana Angela Merkel. “Va a culpar de su salida a estos movimientos nacionalistas”, dijo.

¿Qué ha permitido el auge de los movimientos nacionalistas y populistas en Europa?

Cuando la centroizquierda no pudo responder a los problemas actuales, esto puso las esperanzas de la gente en los nacionalismos. Actualmente la globalización socava la capacidad política del Estado Nación y frente a esto los desafíos son también los de encontrar las respuestas a las fuentes de la ansiedad e incertidumbre que experimenta el electorado. Eso quiere decir empleo, seguridad, sistema de pensiones, básicamente los fundamentos del orden de la posguerra. (…)

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